/India

Best place to see a Bollywood flick in India

Best place to see a Bollywood flick in India
... Hindi, it’s worth taking in a flick to soak up some Bollywood glam. The Raj Mandir cinema in Jaipur, Rajasthan is perhaps the best-known cinema in India and can seat up to 1,237 moviegoers. Opened in 1976, the cinema was designed in Art Moderne style (which is essentially late Art Deco) by architect W.M. Namjoshi and is, rather oddly, shaped like a meringue in pastel hues. Over the years, this Indian icon has hosted many Bollywood premieres. And walking inside the grand foyer, you’ll get a sense...
April 27th, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: bollywood, featuredarticle, India, Jaipur

Art meets recycling in Chandigarh rock garden

Art meets recycling in Chandigarh rock garden
... paths and twisting walkways, through gorges and past waterfalls. The 25-acre Nek Chand Fantasy Rock Garden in Chandigarh, capital of Punjab in India, is one of the country’s most visited attractions, seeing up to 5,000 visitors every day. But it’s also one of the country’s most effective recycling programs. Artist Nek Chand uses recycled junk and urban debris – including electrical sockets, broken bangles, over-burnt bricks, broken pots, tree trunks, rags, plastic dolls, used shoes, fused...
April 24th, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: Chandigarh, India, Nek Chand, Nek Chand Fantasy Rock Garden, Punjab, recycled art

A night at the Chapslee

A night at the Chapslee
... view of the snow-capped Kinner Kailash range, if you’re looking for a place to base yourself in Shimla, state capital of Himachel Pradesh in the Indian Himalayas, look no further than the Raj-era Chapslee. A boutique hotel run by descendants of royalty, a stay here is like taking a step back in time. Chapslee was acquired by Lord Auckland, governor general of the East India Company, in 1835. It was here that the declaration of the first war against Afghanistan, called The Afghan Manifesto, was...
April 21st, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 2
Filed under: boutique hotel, Chapslee, featuredarticle, India

Catch the toy train to Shimla

Catch the toy train to Shimla
Back in the days of the British Raj, India’s elite would head to the hills – the Himalayan foothills, that is – to beat the summer heat. And Shimla (or Simla, as it was referred to then) became the summer capital of India, when the who’s who of Delhi would transfer to the hill station to breathe cool mountain air and attend to the business of running an empire. Now Shimla is the capital of Himachel Pradesh and a popular holiday spot for honeymooners – yet you can still see remnants...
April 14th, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: India, Shimla, Simla, toy train

Evolving Beyond Human Sacrifice

Evolving Beyond Human Sacrifice
... window and noticed Srikand Mahadev (about 6000m) standing tall and handsome in the Himalayan mountains. Srikhand Mahadev, Sarahan, Himachal Pradesh, India I changed routes and 2 hours later found myself in a little known village called Sarahan. The village has a Hindu temple and I chose to stay within its premises. The temple has an ancient Himachali Hindu temple architecture. The walls of the temple are built from wood and stone to make them more resistant to earthquakes. Historically, this region...
April 7th, 2010 | induspride | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: Himalayan Mountains, India, Temples

Agra: A tomb, a fort and a forgotten city

Agra: A tomb, a fort and a forgotten city
... the most romantic stories behind it. But the Taj Mahal, an elaborate marble mausoleum, is only one of three UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Agra in India’s state of Uttar Pradesh. Here’s a rundown of Agra’s top three sites: Taj Mahal Completed in 1653, the Taj Mahal was built by Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan as the final resting place for his beloved wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who died giving birth to their fourteenth child. The mausoleum is perfectly symmetrical, finished in white marble and pietra dura...
April 3rd, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 1
Filed under: featuredarticle, India, Taj Mahal

Photo opp: The ghats of Varanasi

Photo opp: The ghats of Varanasi
It’s the iconic image of India – pilgrims washing away their sins in the holy River Ganges in Varanasi. The best time to take photos (or simply soak up the atmosphere) is sunrise or sunset. If you can manage to rouse yourself for a 5:30am start, head down to the ghats (the steps or landings beside the river) where you can hire a boat or walk along the ghats if the water level is low enough. In the morning, you’ll see people taking a ritual bath, doing yoga and washing clothes. At night, you’ll...
April 2nd, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 1
Filed under: featuredarticle, ghats, India, Varanasi

Visiting Varanasi: Ghats, puja and holy cows

Visiting Varanasi: Ghats, puja and holy cows
No visit to India is complete without a stop at one of the most important pilgrimage sites in the country, and one of the more adventurous – and daunting – destinations for foreign travelers. It’s chaotic, colourful and overwhelming, but it’s quintessential India. Just come prepared with patience and a sense of humour. According to legend, Varanasi – alternatively known as Banaras or Kashi (City of Light) – was founded by the Hindu deity Lord Shiva about 5,000 years ago. Now it’s one...
March 24th, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 1
Filed under: featuredarticle, India, River Ganges, Varanasi

Photo opp: Chinese fishing nets in Kerala

Photo opp: Chinese fishing nets in Kerala
Unique to India, the historical town of Fort Cochin is one place you’ll find a mish-mash of cultural influences living side-by-side, from ancient mosques to a 400-year-old synagogue to Hindu murals in a “Dutch Palace,” along with vestiges of the British Raj and the Portuguese. And you’ll find it in a serene setting along the Malabar Coast in Kerala, in India’s far south, surrounded by coconut groves, where goats and rickshaws still take over the streets. On the tip of...
March 19th, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: Chinese fishing nets, featuredarticle, Fort Cochin, India, Kerala

Cruising Kerala’s backwaters in south India

Cruising Kerala’s backwaters in south India
... love set in 1969. Today, you can sip a cold beverage at the original History House in Roy’s novel, now the Taj Garden Retreat. Kerala is one of India’s most prosperous states, with what it claims is a 100 per cent literacy rate (arts and education are highly valued). After independence, citizens voted in a communist government, and as a result the state has a more equal distribution of land and income than other parts of India. While it’s more progressive, Roy does point out the trials...
March 16th, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: featuredarticle, India

Where to find the best thali in Mumbai

Where to find the best thali in Mumbai
There are many reasons to travel to India, and food is one of them – despite its reputation for Delhi Belly. While dishes vary across the country – from the seafood curries of Kerala to the tandoori flavours of Punjab – one common dish you’ll find almost everywhere is the thali. This is essentially an all-you-can-eat meal served on a large stainless steel plate with small stainless steel bowls that are continuously filled with food until you’re ready to burst. A thali...
March 12th, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: featuredarticle, India, indian food, Mumbai, thali

Best cultural festivals of 2010

Best cultural festivals of 2010
... dzongs (a type of fortress architecture distinct to the Himalayas), which instructs onlookers in the ways of Buddhist Dharma. Dipavali or Diwali, India, Nepal, Malaysia & Singapore Nov. 5-9, 2010 This is known as the Festival of Lights; in Sanskrit, Dipavali means “row of lamps.” People light small clay lamps to signify the triumph of good over evil and celebrate one’s inner light. Festivities, which include setting off firecrackers and exchanging sweets, take place across India...
January 1st, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: Bhutan, cultural festivals, Dipavali, Diwali, featuredarticle, festivals, Guatemala, India, Loy Krathong, Malaysia, Mongolia, Naadam, Nepal, Semana Santa, Singapore, Tangbi Mani, Thailand

Experience the Joy and Energy of Bhangra!

... enjoyed myself so much! Such a lot of joy and energy. What is Bhangra? Bhangra is a form of music and dance that originated in the Punjab area of India. It’s most commonly associated with the Sikhs and began as a folk dance conducted by farmers to celebrate the coming of Spring or Vaisakhi. Today it survives in different forms and styles including pop music, film soundtracks and even in competitions. You can see and participate in Bhangra this week at the City of Bhangra Festival, a nine days...
February 18th, 2009 | thevancouverguide | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: Bhangra, fok dance, India, music, The Arts