/architecture

Seattle’s Pioneer Square Pergola

Seattle’s Pioneer Square Pergola
At the triangular corner of Seattle’s Yesler Way and First Avenue, is Pioneer Square Park’s Pergola.  The Pergola was originally built in 1909 as a shelter for passengers waiting for the Yesler Way cable car.  Built in Victorian Style, out of iron and glass, the Pergola offered riders 60 feet of protection from the weather and harsh Seattle elements. The Pergola was restored in 1972, and designated a historic landmark in 1977, only to be demolished in an accident.  In January of 2001, a truck...
May 10th, 2010 | Mary Jo Manzanares | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, Pioneer-Square

Cicek Passaji – a Flower Passage which sells no flowers

Cicek Passaji – a Flower Passage which sells no flowers
When I travel to a new destination, I approach it in two ways:  on the one hand I make myself familiar with what it is all about  and what I want to see. But not too much, because  what for me is the essence of travel is to be surprised by unexpected places, names and sights which beckon to be explored. That’s what happened to me when I heard about the Flower Passage (map) in Istanbul’s Beyoglu district. It sounded colourful, fragrant, vibrant  and plain nice, so off I went without consulting...
May 9th, 2010 | inka | Read More | Comments: 1
Filed under: architecture, Attractions, Shopping

Exploring Buenos Aires: Visit the Amazing Galerías Pacífico

Exploring Buenos Aires: Visit the Amazing Galerías Pacífico
Located on the intersection of Calle Florida and Avenida Córdoba, at the heart of downtown Buenos Aires, Galerías Pacífico has to be the most architecturally beautiful shopping center in Argentina. It was built in 1891, designed to resemble the Bon Marche in Paris, France. It was the major shopping mall in Buenos Aires until 1945, when the building was taken over by the state-run railroad company and fell into disuse and disrepair. In the early 1990´s it was awarded to a private company as...
May 6th, 2010 | Pablo Juan Augustinowicz | Read More | Comments: 3
Filed under: architecture, Performing Arts - Theater & Dance, Shopping, The Arts

Sydney Photo Friday: Mortuary Station

Sydney Photo Friday: Mortuary Station
Despite spending plenty of time around Central Station, I’m afraid I’ve never noticed Mortuary Station which sits close by. Apparently between 1869 and 1937, trains left this station and traveled to Rockwood Necropolis cemetery. But soon a time came that people preferred to drive the relatively short distance, and the line was cancelled. The State Rail Authority recently restored this beautiful building, but it doesn’t have a job as yet. I’d love to see it become a funky café, or even an...
April 30th, 2010 | Lauren Katulka | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, Photos

Cementerio de la Recoleta, the City of the Dead

Cementerio de la Recoleta, the City of the Dead
... of the most patrician of porteño families. Lovers of sculpture and wrought-iron finery (not to mention the macabre) can wander for hours. The architecture styles of the tombs range from neo classic to art deco and the some of the sculptures have been declared national historic monuments. The Cemetery was primitively an orchard belonging to the Recoletos Franciscan monks, whose convent (built in 1716) stood on the site currently occupied by the Centro Cultural Recoleta. It was turned into the Northern...
April 26th, 2010 | Pablo Juan Augustinowicz | Read More | Comments: 1
Filed under: architecture, featuredarticle, History & Information, sculptures

A market saved

A market saved
... a Grade II listed building, giving it protection against demolition or conversion. Now the Granville Arcade is not one of the greatest pieces of architecture you will ever see, but it’s part of a group of buildings that preserve a little piece of history and a way of life. These covered markets are unique to Brixton – nowhere else in London has them – and they were taken up by the Windrush generation to provide a focus for the West Indian community in the city. Small units allowed...
April 23rd, 2010 | Andrea Kirkby | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, brixton, london markets

The wooden houses of Istanbul

The wooden houses of Istanbul
Looking at all the famous stone monuments like mosques and palaces as well as the massive city walls surrounding Istanbul, it comes as quite a surprise to learn, that until World War I, wood was actually the preferred material of construction in the city. The modern day high rises which dominate Istanbul’s sky line and are quickly transforming the city into a version of ‘Manhattan on the Bosporus’, have broken with the century old Ottoman tradition of building humble  dwellings  as well as...
April 21st, 2010 | inka | Read More | Comments: 4
Filed under: architecture, history, top-feature

Binbirdirek and Basilica Cisterns

Binbirdirek and Basilica Cisterns
Not one but two underground wonderlands are to be found in Istanbul’s   Sultanahmed district. Both were once huge water reservoirs and still leave today’s visitors gaping in amazement at the sheer size and the elaborate beauty of the work of architects and stone masons from times gone by. Binbirdirek Cistern Also known as the Cistern of 1001 (binbir) Pillars, the underground water reservoir was built by senator Philoxenus in the 4th century to supply the water needs of his nearby palace....
April 14th, 2010 | inka | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, Attractions, featuredarticle

Sydney Photo Friday: Cadmans Cottage

Sydney Photo Friday: Cadmans Cottage
Cadmans Cottage might not look like much from first glance, but there’s more to this Sydney building than meets the eye. It was erected in 1816, which makes it the oldest surviving residential building in the city. It’s also the first building to be built in The Rocks. It’s led a colorful life as the living quarters of governmental coxswains, the headquarters of the Sydney Water police, and the Sailor’s Home. It achieved heritage status in 1972 and was promptly restored to its former glory. Today...
April 2nd, 2010 | Lauren Katulka | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, history, photo

Exclusive Tours of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Most Famous Architectural Masterpieces

Exclusive Tours of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Most Famous Architectural Masterpieces
... downtown to the new Trump Tower along the Chicago River, on almost every street in the city, if you look up you will be in awe of Chicago’s architecture treasures. One of Chicago’s greatest architects is Frank Lloyd Wright known for his Prairie-style houses and buildings. In honor of Wright’s architecture successes in Chicago, the Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust is hosting an architectural excursion throughout Chicago June 23 – 27. The excursion will include tours of Wright-designed...
March 31st, 2010 | Lisa Davis | Read More | Comments: 1
Filed under: architecture, Tours

Sydney Photo Friday: Queen Victoria Building

Sydney Photo Friday: Queen Victoria Building
It might house a shopping centre, but Sydney’s Queen Victoria Building is actually one of my favourite examples of architecture in the city. It was built in the late 19th century in the Romaneque Revival style, and surprisingly it was always meant to be a shopping centre! It originally housed coffee shops, tailors, hairdressers, and florists. Later the concert hall became a library, and the building began to house council offices rather than shops. Perhaps its life as a boring office block took...
March 26th, 2010 | Lauren Katulka | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, Photos, shopping centers

Sydney Photo Friday: Camperdown Cemetary Lodge

Sydney Photo Friday: Camperdown Cemetary Lodge
This charming lodge at Camperdown Cemetary is a gorgeous example of Colonial neo-Gothic style architecture. It’s not very big, but there are three rooms and an attic inside. It reminds me a lot of the house Snow White and the seven dwarves may have lived in! The Moreton bay fig you see in the front of the shot was actually planted in 1848 to commemorate the lodge’s roofing. That tree is actually the oldest in the surrounding area, so it’s pretty special indeed! Image source: TTaylor @ Wikipedia...
March 19th, 2010 | Lauren Katulka | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, Photos

London gets a new US Embassy

London gets a new US Embassy
... modern building technologies to make it sustainable. It was designed by architectural firm Kieran Timberlake, which has specialised in sustainable architecture. There will be photovoltaic cells on the roof, and the glass-polymer skin will help to diffuse excessive heat on sunny days. Building will begin in 2013, and the new embassy should be ready for use in 2017. It certainly looks a lot friendlier than the existing embassy, a building of 1960 by Eemo Saarinen which dominates one side of Grosvenor...
March 15th, 2010 | Andrea Kirkby | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, featuredarticle, News, US embassy

Sydney Photo Friday: North Sydney Post Office

Sydney Photo Friday: North Sydney Post Office
... While we may not have been around as long as many buildings in other parts of the world, we retain our links to the past with beautiful architecture like this. This stunner is actually the post office in North Sydney. This federation style building is much more attractive than any modern, personality-free facility, and I’m so glad to see it preserved. Image source: Sardaka @ Wikipedia Commons ...
March 12th, 2010 | Lauren Katulka | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, photo

Exploring India’s maximum city: Mumbai

Exploring India’s maximum city: Mumbai
... at least a glimpse of Mehta’s Maximum City is through an architectural walking tour to discover Bombay lost and found, from its Gothic architecture to the fading glory of its art deco buildings. Bombay Heritage Walks (BHW) has been organizing walking tours around the city since 1999 to raise awareness of its architecture and heritage monuments, which trace the social and cultural history of the city. Note that some buildings are no longer accessible to the public since the bombings of...
March 10th, 2010 | Vawn | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, Bombay, featuredarticle

Preservation and Progress: Boston’s Architecture

Preservation and Progress: Boston’s Architecture
... a waterfront location.  Built in 1999 ,the rounded glass front and red brick building is stunning and is a much acclaimed example of modern public architecture. Perched on the edge of Boston Harbor the glass and steel building designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro  was opened in 2006 as the new facility of  the Institute of Contemporary Art ( 100 Northern Ave., Boston, 617-478-3100)(Map) and in just a few short years has managed to transform the South Boston Seaport District. Image Credit: Boston...
March 5th, 2010 | Maria Olia | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, featuredarticle, History & Information

Sydney Photo Friday: Bahai House of Worship

Sydney Photo Friday: Bahai House of Worship
I love this Bahai House of Worship, which sits in Ingleside, Sydney. It reminds us all of the diversity of religion we find in our multicultural city. It opened its doors to Bahai worshippers in 1961, and has stood proudly in the bushlands of western Sydney ever since. As the only temple of its kind in Australia, it serves as the Mother Temple for all local followers of the Bahai faith. Image source: DO’Neil @ Wikipedia Commons ...
March 5th, 2010 | Lauren Katulka | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, photo, temple

Sydney Photo Friday: Anderson Stuart Building

Sydney Photo Friday: Anderson Stuart Building
... every day, it’s easy for them to seem commonplace. For the next couple of Fridays, I plan on reminding my readers just how beautiful the architecture of Sydney is. This is Anderson Stuart Building, a stunning building housing the Medical School at the University of Sydney. Just think how inspired you’d be stepping through the doors of such a majestic building! Image source: Sumple @ Wikipedia Commons ...
February 26th, 2010 | Lauren Katulka | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, Photos

Avenida Alvear, A Very Elegant Street…

Avenida Alvear, A Very Elegant Street…
While visiting Buenos Aires, if you ever get the urge to walk among the rich but not so famous there is a street that I reckon you might like to cover Avenida Alvear. It is one of the most upper class streets to be found in the city. Beginning at the barrio de la Recoleta, right at the Alvear memorial, just one block north of the Basílica del Pilar, the avenue runs for only seven blocks, ending at the Plazoleta Carlos Pellegrini, near the north end of the Avenida 9 de Julio. Huge palaces can...
February 11th, 2010 | Pablo Juan Augustinowicz | Read More | Comments: 2
Filed under: architecture, avenida alvear, Buenos Aires, recoleta, Shopping

UW Photo Op: Paul Allen Computer Science & Engineering Building

UW Photo Op: Paul Allen Computer Science & Engineering Building
Seattle is home to many computer and technology giants, both individuals and companies.  One of those giants, Paul Allen, is the namesake for the Computer Science and Engineering Building (map) at the University of Washington (map). The UW was founded in 1861, and is a well respected public research university.  It’s the largest university in Washington State, and one of the oldest on the west coast.  The university has three campuses, the largest in the University District (where the computer...
January 31st, 2010 | Mary Jo Manzanares | Read More | Comments: 0
Filed under: architecture, colleges, University-of-Washington