/ The Mexico City Guide
Mexico — By Laura Nazimiec on July 6, 2010 at 3:01 pm
Filed under: Art, attraction, museum, top-feature

Around Mexico City with Frida and Diego

Frida Kahlo was born on July 6, 1907 in the Coyoacán neighborhood of Mexico City.  Renowned as one of Mexico’s great artists of the 20th century, Kahlo’s paintings are recognized around the world.  In 2007, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Kahlo’s birth, an exhibition of her work shown at the palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City attracted more than 440,000 attendees.  Exploring the world of Frida Kahlo has become a favorite activity among visitors to Mexico City and her artwork together with that of her husband, Diego Rivera, is on display in various locations throughout the capital.

La Casa Azul, Mexico DF

Frida Kahlo Museum, Coyoacán, Mexico City

The Frida Kahlo Museum

The Frida Kahlo Museum (Museo Frida Kahlo) or Blue House (Casa Azul) is housed in Frida Kahlo’s former home in the Coyoacán neighborhood of the city.  In addition to displaying a few pieces of her work, the house is decorated with many of her personal belongings including kitchen items, jewelry, clothing, photos and a variety of pre-Hispanic and Mexican crafts.  The Frida Kahlo Museum (map) is located at Londres 247 and Allende in Coyoacán.  The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10am-6pm.  Admission is M$45 ($3.60) and includes admission to the Anahuacalli Museum.

The Anahuacalli Museum

The Anahuacalli Museum houses Diego Rivera’s collection of pre-Hispanic art, one of his former art studios and some of his work.  The building itself was designed by the artist and resembles a temple-like structure.  It was constructed of dark volcanic stone.  The Anahuacalli Museum (map) is located at Calle del Museo 150 in the San Pablo Tepetlapa neighborhood, roughly 3.5 km south of the center of Coyoacán.  The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10am-6pm.  Admission is M$45 ($3.60) and includes admission to the Frida Kahlo museum (see above).  Both museums are decorated with elaborate offerings during the annual Day of the Dead celebrations to honor the artists.

The Dolores Olmedo Museum

The Dolores Olmedo Museum (Museo Dolores Olmedo Patiño)houses a collection work by Diego Rivera including oil paintings and watercolors alongside a collection of paintings by Frida Kahlo.  The museum is the former home of Mexican socialite Dolores Olmedo Patiño.  Also on display are pre-Hispanic artifacts and pieces of Mexican folk art.  The Dolores Olmedo Museum (map) is located at Avenida Mexico 5843 in the southern Xochimilco borough of Mexico City.  The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10am-6pm.  Admission is M$40 ($3.20) and free on Tuesdays.

museo frida kahlo, coyoac'an, mexico df

Day of the Dead Offering at the Frida Kahlo Museum

The Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Studio Museum

The Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Studio Museum (Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo) served as the home of the couple for several years during the 1930’s. The home was originally designed by architect and painter Juan O’Gorman.  One of Rivera’s studios is preserved upstairs and there are changing exhibits of Frida Kahlo’s work on display in the lower level of the home.  The Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo Studio Museum (map) is located at Diego Rivera 2 and Altavista in the San Ángel neighborhood of Mexico City.  The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10am-6pm.  Admission is M$10 ($0.80) and free on Sundays.

The Diego Rivera Mural Museum

The Diego Rivera Mural Museum (Museo Mural Diego Rivera) houses one of the artists most famous works, the Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in Alameda mural.  The museum was specifically constructed to house the mural after its original location in the Hotel Prado was damaged during the 1985 earthquake.  The Diego Rivera Mural Museum (map) is located on the corner of Balderas and Colón in the historic center just west of Alameda Park.  The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10am-6pm.  Admission is M$15 ($1.20) and free on Sundays.

Many of Diego Riviera’s murals can also be seen in other locations throughout Mexico City.  The National Palace (Palacio Nacional) (map) houses several dramatic Rivera murals depicting Mexican history and civilization.  The courtyards of the Secretary of Education building (Secretaría de Educación Pública) (map) are lined with frescos painted by the artist.  The Palace of Fine Arts (Palacio de Bellas Artes) (map) houses Rivera’s famous mural entitled Man at the Crossroads and several murals and a sculpture by Rivera are on display in the Chapultepec Park Water Works (map).  Diego Rivera also created the elaborate mural that’s located over the main entrance of the Olympic Stadium (Estadio Olímpico) (map) on the UNAM campus.

Photo Credits: Laura Nazimiec

Related places:
  1. A
    Museo Frida Kahlo
    Del Carmen, Coyoac?n, Ciudad de M?xico, Distrito Federal, M?xico
    View Details and Book
  2. B
    Museo Anahuacalli
    Museo 150, San Pablo Tepetlapa, 04620 Mexico City, D.f., Mexico
    View Details and Book
  3. C
    Museo Dolores Olmedo Pati?o
    M?xico 5843, La Galvia, la Noria, 16030 M?xico, Distrito Federal, M?xico
    View Details and Book
  4. D
    Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo
    Diego Rivera 2, Mexiko-Stadt, Distrito Federal, Mexiko
    View Details and Book
  5. E
    Museo Mural Diego Rivera
    Balderas, Centro, Cuauht?moc, Ciudad de M?xico, Distrito Federal, M?xico
    View Details and Book
  6. F
    Palacio Nacional
    Moneda, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, M?xico
    View Details and Book
  7. G
    Secretaria de Educacion Publica
    Rep?blica de Cuba, Mexico City, D.f., Mexico
    View Details and Book
  8. H
    Palacio de Bellas Artes
    Eje Central L?zaro C?rdenas, 06050 Mexico City, D.f., Mexico
    View Details and Book
  9. I
    Bosque de Chapultepec, Distrito Federal
    Bosque de Chapultepec, Distrito Federal, Mexico
    View Details and Book
  10. J
    Estadio Ol?mpico Universitario
    Mexico, undefined
    View Details and Book
Tags: Art, attraction, museum, top-feature


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